The awkward stretching movement

He’s referring to Peter Day of BBC News’s piece here. But the best bit is this bit:

Immediately, zonk! Back comes the seat as the person in front assumes relax mode as a default position. The mean battery hen space already allotted to an economy class passenger is clipped even further. You are suddenly presented with eight or 12 hours of prison.

So, faced with the anonymous unpleasantness of the passenger in front of me, I made a public vow. Never again – I promised listeners – would I press that tempting shiny button on the right hand side of the armrest. And ever since, I have not

I do this, or rather don’t, too, for precisely the same reasons. I may not be able to stop you flopping into my personal space but at least I can avoid inflicting it on the person behind me, and who knows, perhaps it’ll catch on.

I mean, first there was just me and now there’s this BBC guy, and pretty soon they’ll call it a movement. A sort of cramped, sleepless movement with a back like a greasy, Moldovan tugboat, but a movement none the less. An awkward stretching movement.

He’s also very much right about the dullards watching The Fast and the Furious 7: Deepening Righteousness when they could be looking at huge cracks in Hudson Bay or whatever.

2 Comments on "The awkward stretching movement"


  1. He’s also very much right about the dullards watching The Fast and the Furious 7: Deepening Righteousness when they could be looking at huge cracks in Hudson Bay or whatever.

    Or a massive night-time tropical thunderstorm, recently. Spectacular. Must have been about 200 lightning flashes a minute; it looked like an artillery barrage. Europe-NY is basically just sea and cloud, but Europe-West Coast gets you the North-West Passage, and Europe-Far East gets you spectacular deserts and mountains in Iran and India.

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  2. I may not be able to stop you flopping into my personal space but at least I can avoid inflicting it on the person behind me, and who knows, perhaps it’ll catch on.

    Completely subjectively, I get the impression that it has caught on, at least on short haul flights. It happens to me a lot less than it did ten or twenty years ago, but I have no idea what to attribute this to.

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